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  Magnesium
Did you know that 68 percent of adults are magnesium deficient, an astounding 19% consume less than 50% of the minimum of the USRDA?
 
$1.30
Sample

10 count bottle 350 mg capsules
10 Count Bottle
650mg Capsules
$21.99
1 Month Supply

magnesium chelate 180 count
180 Count Bottle
650mg Capsules
  • Overview
  • Ingredients
  • Directions
  • Side Effects

Magnesium helps regulate blood sugar levels, promotes normal blood pressure, and is known to be involved in energy metabolism and protein synthesis. There is an increased interest in the role of magnesium in preventing and managing disorders such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Dietary magnesium is absorbed in the small intestines. Magnesium is excreted through the kidneys.

Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, keeps heart rhythm steady, supports a healthy immune system, and keeps bones strong.

Magnesium Ascorbate

Magnesium Asparate

Magnesium Succinate

Total ...........................................................................................................650mg

This product is pure nutrition; no fillers, additives or synthetic chemicals.  
The gelatin capsule complies with the requirements published in:

The United States Pharmacopoeia (USP); XXIV / National Formulary (NF) 19
The European Pharmacopoeia (EP); 3rd Edition

Kosher and Halal certified

Bowel Tolerance

The amount of magnesium your body requires is based on the amount of deficiency your body is presenting. Some will need one capsule while others will need more (possibly 12 capsules.) However, start with one capsule per meal to see what your body needs and follow the dosing schedule below.

First day Examples:

  • 1 capsule at breakfast with meal.
  • 1 capsule at lunch with meal.
  • 1 capsule at dinner with meal.
Second day Examples:
  • 1 capsule at breakfast with meal.
  • 2 capsule at lunch with meal.
  • 1 capsule at dinner with meal.

Let’s assume your stool is becoming normal or putty-like in consistency, you have reached Bowel Tolerance.

This method allows your body to slowly absorb the magnesium into your body.

As your body corrects its deficiency you will not be able to take as much magnesium as you once did. Your body is controlling the uptake of the mineral into the body.

Why to break-up your Dosage?

If you take multiple capsules at one time you increase the likelihood of creating gastrointestinal track irritation, this will loosen your stool but your absorption will be hindered.  

The amount of magnesium that is being absorbed is about 30% of the total weight consumed when all things are perfect. The reason I prefer chelate versions of magnesium is the chelates are less irritating versus magnesium chloride or magnesium sulfate. They contain a higher degree of elemental mg but because of the irritating properties to the gastrointestinal track the actual absorption is lower.  

Magnesium sulfate, commonly called Epsom salt, is great to soak your feet in or your whole body, and if you are taking opioids it is strong enough to stimulate a bowl movement. However, Magnesium sulfate is not the best oral method for Magnesium absorption because of the tendency to cause diarrhea.

So the idea is not to cause loose stool or diarrhea but to correct your body’s nutritional deficiency allowing the natural health elimination to take place not a chemical irritant action.

Dietary Supplement:
1-5 Capsules per day.

Therapeutic Supplement:
6-10 Capsules per day.

Side effects, nausea, loos stool.

Toxicity from increased magnesium intake are not common because the body removes excess amounts. Magnesium excess almost always occurs only when magnesium is supplied as a intravenous transfusion.

Signs of Magnesium Toxicity

Slow Heartbeat

Fatigue

Weakness

Muscle Tremors

Decreased Reflexes

Anesthia

Coma

Diarrhea

 

 

Magnesium: What is it?

Magnesium is essential to good health. Approximately 50% of total body magnesium is found in bone. The other half is found predominantly inside cells of body tissues and organs. Only 1% of magnesium is found in blood, but the body works very hard to keep blood levels of magnesium constant

 
 

When can magnesium deficiency occur?

While 68 percent of adults are magnesium deficient, an astounding 19% consume less than 50% of the minimum of the USRDA.

The prevalence of heart disease, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, insulin resistance, and arterial wall thickness has been reported in numerous clinical studies to be linked to low magnesium levels.

Even though dietary surveys suggest that many Americans do not get recommended amounts of magnesium, symptoms of magnesium deficiency are rarely recognized in the US. However, there is concern that some people may not have enough body stores of magnesium because dietary intake may not be high enough. Having enough body stores of magnesium may be protective against disorders such as cardiovascular disease and immune dysfunction.

The health status of the digestive system and the kidneys significantly influence magnesium status. Magnesium is absorbed in the intestines and then transported through the blood to cells and tissues. Approximately one-third to one-half of dietary magnesium is absorbed into the body. Gastrointestinal disorders that impair absorption such as Crohn's disease can limit the body's ability to absorb magnesium. These disorders can deplete the body's stores of magnesium and in extreme cases may result in magnesium deficiency. Chronic or excessive vomiting and diarrhea may also result in magnesium depletion.

Healthy kidneys are able to limit urinary excretion of magnesium to make up for low dietary intake. However, excessive loss of magnesium in urine can be a side effect of some medications and can also occur in cases of poorly-controlled diabetes and alcohol abuse.

Early Signs of Magnesium Deficiency

Early signs of magnesium deficiency include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and weakness. As magnesium deficiency worsens, numbness, tingling, muscle contractions and cramps, seizures (sudden changes in behaviors caused by excessive electrical activity in the brain), personality changes, abnormal heart rhythms, and coronary spasms can occur. Severe magnesium deficiency can result in low levels of calcium in the blood (hypocalcemia). Magnesium deficiency is also associated with low levels of potassium in the blood (hypokalemia). (Full list a bottom of page.).

Many of these symptoms are general and can result from a variety of medical conditions other than magnesium deficiency.

An example:
fatigue is a classic symptom of magnesium deficiency, but it could also be a symptom to low oxygen from rouleaux or adrenal fatigue affecting your body’s chemical messengers creating dysfunctions in communication, that could cause lack of sleep to depression just to name a few of the symptoms of adrenal fatigue.  

Looking at only one symptom does not give us the whole story of your health. It is important to understand how your body communicates with you so you can take corrective action, before it becomes a real issue.

 
 

Magnesium Supplements

Oral magnesium supplements combine with magnesium rich food is the best. Elemental magnesium refers to the amount of magnesium in each compound. The amount of elemental magnesium in a compound and its bioavailability influence the effectiveness of the magnesium supplement. Bioavailability refers to the amount of magnesium in food, supplements that is absorbed in the intestines and ultimately available for biological activity in your cells and tissues.

 
 

Diabetes

Individuals with poorly-controlled diabetes may benefit from magnesium supplements because of increased magnesium loss in urine associated with hyperglycemia.

Magnesium and Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease resulting in insufficient production and/or inefficient use of insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Insulin helps convert sugar and starches in food into energy to sustain life. There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is most often diagnosed in children and adolescents, and results from the body's inability to make insulin. Type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes referred to as adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. It is usually seen in adults and is most often associated with an inability to use the insulin made by the pancreas. Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. In recent years, rates of type 2 diabetes have increased along with the rising rates of obesity.

Carbohydrate Metabolism

Magnesium plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism. It may influence the release and activity of insulin, the hormone that helps control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Low blood levels of magnesium (hypomagnesemia) are frequently seen in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Hypomagnesemia may worsen insulin resistance, a condition that often precedes diabetes, or may be a consequence of insulin resistance. Individuals with insulin resistance do not use insulin efficiently and require greater amounts of insulin to maintain blood sugar within normal levels. The kidneys possibly lose their ability to retain magnesium during periods of severe hyperglycemia (significantly elevated blood glucose). The increased loss of magnesium in urine may then result in lower blood levels of magnesium. In older adults, correcting magnesium depletion may improve insulin response and action .

The Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study (HFS) follow more than 170,000 health professionals through questionnaires the participants complete every 2 years. Diet was first evaluated in 1980 in the NHS and in 1986 in the HFS, and dietary assessments have been completed every 2 to 4 years since. Information on the use of dietary supplements, including multivitamins, is also collected. As part of these studies, over 127,000 participants (85,060 women and 42,872 men) with no history of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer at baseline were followed to examine risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. Women were followed for 18 years; men were followed for 12 years. Over time, the risk for developing type 2 diabetes was greater in men and women with a lower magnesium intake. This study supports the dietary recommendation to increase consumption of major food sources of magnesium, such as whole grains, nuts, and green leafy vegetables .

The Iowa Women's Health Study has followed a group of older women since 1986. Researchers from this study examined the association between women's risk of developing type 2 diabetes and intake of carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and dietary magnesium. Dietary intake was estimated by a food frequency questionnaire, and incidence of diabetes throughout 6 years of follow-up was determined by asking participants if they had been diagnosed by a doctor as having diabetes. Based on baseline dietary intake assessment only, researchers' findings suggested that a greater intake of whole grains, dietary fiber, and magnesium decreased the risk of developing diabetes in older women.

The Women's Health Study was originally designed to evaluate the benefits versus risks of low-dose aspirin and vitamin E supplementation in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer in women 45 years of age and older. In an examination of almost 40,000 women participating in this study, researchers also examined the association between magnesium intake and incidence of type 2 diabetes over an average of 6 years. Among women who were overweight, the risk of developing type 2 diabetes was significantly greater among those with lower magnesium intake. This study also supports the dietary recommendation to increase consumption of major food sources of magnesium, such as whole grains, nuts, and green leafy vegetables.
Several clinical studies have examined the potential benefit of supplemental magnesium on control of type 2 diabetes. In one such study, 63 subjects with below normal serum magnesium levels received either 2.5 grams of oral magnesium chloride daily "in liquid form" (providing 300 mg elemental magnesium per day) or a placebo. At the end of the 16-week study period, those who received the magnesium supplement had higher blood levels of magnesium and improved control of diabetes, as suggested by lower hemoglobin A1C levels, than those who received a placebo. Hemoglobin A1C is a test that measures overall control of blood glucose over the previous 2 to 3 months, and is considered by many doctors to be the single most important blood test for diabetics.

Mg Oxide Increase Did Not Control Diabetes

In another study, 128 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive a placebo or a supplement with either 500 mg or 1000 mg of magnesium oxide (MgO) for 30 days. All patients were also treated with diet or diet plus oral medication to control blood glucose levels. Magnesium levels increased in the group receiving 1000 mg magnesium oxide per day (equal to 600 mg elemental magnesium per day) but did not significantly change in the placebo group or the group receiving 500 mg of magnesium oxide per day (equal to 300 mg elemental magnesium per day). However, neither level of magnesium supplementation significantly improved blood glucose control.

 
 

Alcohol

Magnesium supplementation may be indicated for persons with alcoholism. Low blood levels of magnesium occur in 30% to 60% of alcoholics, and in nearly 90% of patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal. Anyone who substitutes alcohol for food will usually have significantly lower magnesium intakes.

Individuals with chronic malabsorptive problems such as Crohn's disease, gluten sensitive enteropathy, regional enteritis, and intestinal surgery may lose magnesium through diarrhea and fat malabsorption. Individuals with these conditions may need supplemental magnesium.

 
 

Seniors

Older adults are at increased risk for magnesium deficiency. The 1999-2000 and 1998-94 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys suggest that older adults have lower dietary intakes of magnesium than younger adults. In addition, magnesium absorption decreases and renal excretion of magnesium increases in older adults.

Seniors are also more likely to be taking drugs that interact with magnesium. This combination of factors places older adults at risk for magnesium deficiency. It is very important for older adults to get recommended amounts of dietary magnesium

 
 

Magnesium and Blood Pressure

"Epidemiologic evidence suggests that magnesium may play an important role in regulating blood pressure." Diets that provide plenty of fruits and vegetables, which are good sources of potassium and magnesium, are consistently associated with lower blood pressure. The DASH study (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), a human clinical trial, suggested that high blood pressure could be significantly lowered by a diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, and low fat dairy foods. Such a diet will be high in magnesium, potassium, and calcium, and low in sodium and fat.

An observational study examined the effect of various nutritional factors on incidence of high blood pressure in over 30,000 US male health professionals. After four years of follow-up, it was found that a lower risk of hypertension was associated with dietary patterns that provided more magnesium, potassium, and dietary fiber. For 6 years, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study followed approximately 8,000 men and women who were initially free of hypertension. In this study, the risk of developing hypertension decreased as dietary magnesium intake increased in women, but not in men.

Foods high in magnesium are frequently high in potassium and dietary fiber. This makes it difficult to evaluate the independent effect of magnesium on blood pressure. However, newer scientific evidence from DASH clinical trials is strong enough that the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure states that diets that provide plenty of magnesium are positive lifestyle modifications for individuals with hypertension. This group recommends the DASH diet as a beneficial eating plan for people with hypertension and for those with "prehypertension" who desire to prevent high blood pressure.

 
 

Magnesium and cardiovascular disease
Magnesium metabolism influence cardiovascular disease.

Stroke & Heart Attack

Dietary surveys have suggested that a higher magnesium intake can reduce the risk of having a stroke. There is also evidence that low body stores of magnesium increase the risk of abnormal heart rhythms, which may increase the risk of complications after a heart attack. These studies suggest that consuming recommended amounts of magnesium may be beneficial to the cardiovascular system. They have also prompted interest in clinical trials to determine the effect of magnesium supplements on cardiovascular disease.

Several studies suggest that magnesium supplementation may improve clinical outcomes in individuals with coronary disease. In one of these studies, the effect of magnesium supplementation on exercise tolerance (the ability to walk on a treadmill or ride a bicycle), chest pain caused by exercise, and quality of life was examined in 187 patients. Patients received either a placebo or a supplement providing 365 milligrams of magnesium citrate twice daily for 6 months. At the end of the study period researchers found that magnesium therapy significantly increased magnesium levels. Patients receiving magnesium had a 14 percent improvement in exercise duration as compared to no change in the placebo group. Those receiving magnesium were also less likely to experience chest pain caused by exercise.

Coronary Disease

In another study, 50 men and women with stable coronary disease were randomized to receive either a placebo or a magnesium supplement that provided 342 mg magnesium oxide twice daily. After 6 months, those who received the oral magnesium supplement were found to have improved exercise tolerance.

Magnesium Oxide Failed to Control Blood Clotting

In a third study, researchers examined whether magnesium supplementation would add to the anti-thrombotic (anti-clotting) effects of aspirin in 42 coronary patients. For three months, each patient received either a placebo or a supplement with 400 mg of magnesium oxide two to three times daily. After a four-week break without any treatment, treatment groups were reversed so that each person in the study then received the alternate treatment for three months. Researchers found that supplemental magnesium did provide an additional anti-thrombotic effect.

 
 

Magnesium and Osteoporosis

Bone health is supported by many factors, most notably calcium and vitamin D. However, some evidence suggests that magnesium deficiency may be an additional risk factor for postmenopausal osteoporosis. This may be due to the fact that magnesium deficiency alters calcium metabolism and the hormones that regulate calcium.

Several human studies have suggested that magnesium supplementation may improve bone mineral density. In a study of older adults, a greater magnesium intake maintained bone mineral density to a greater degree than a lower magnesium intake.

Diets that provide recommended levels of magnesium are beneficial for bone health.

 
 

Some Medicines Create Magnesium Deficiency

Some medicines may result in magnesium deficiency, including certain diuretics, antibiotics, and medications used to treat cancer (anti-neoplastic medication).
Examples of these medications are:

o Diuretics: Lasix, Bumex, Edecrin, and hydrochlorothiazide
o Antibiotics: Gentamicin, and Amphotericin
o Anti-neoplastic medication: Cisplatin

Low potassium & calcium

Individuals with chronically low blood levels of potassium and calcium may have an underlying problem with magnesium deficiency. Magnesium supplements may help correct the potassium and calcium deficiencies.

 
 

    Pediatric Medicine/ ADHD

    Department of Family Medicine, Pomeranian Medical Academy, Szczecin, Poland. A positive influence of magnesium in the prevention and treatment of hyperactivity in children is more and more frequently raised in the literature. The goal of the work was to estimate magnesium contents in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, (ADHD). The investigations comprised 116 children (94 boys and 20 girls), aged 9-12 years, with recognized ADHD.

    In 68 out of 116 patients examined ADHD occurred with other coexisting disorders specific to the developmental age and in the remaining 48 patients it occurred together with disruptive behaviour. Magnesium levels have been determined in blood serum, red blood cells and in hair with the aid of atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Magnesium deficiency was found in 95 per cent of those examined, most frequently in hair (77.6 per cent), in red blood cells (58.6 per cent) and in blood serum (33.6 per cent) of children with ADHD.

    The conclusion from the investigations is that magnesium deficiency in children with ADHD occurs more frequently than in healthy children. Analysis of the material indicated the correlation between levels of magnesium and the quotient of development to freedom from distractibility.

 
 
  Age of Person mg* need per 24 hours  
Male*

   19-30 years in age

400mg  
     31-70 years in age 420mg  
Female*    19-30 years in age 310mg  
     31-70 years in age 320mg  
          Pregnancy 350-400mg  
          Breast Feeding Same as age  
  mg = millograms    
 
 
RDA Chart
 
 

*When reviewing information concerning nutrition, understand that the RDA is not the maximum requirement of a given nutrient. The RDA is, in fact, below the minimum requirement. Put frankly, if you only get the RDA of magnesium in your diet, this will lead to nutritional deficiencies that cause damage to your body.

When determining your body’s metabolic needs of magnesium, you need to figure into the equation foods you consume on a daily basis, the amount of exercise, and any allopathic drugs, e.g. diuretics, and if your body is suffering from damaged organ, e.g., renal disease. Obviously, if your body is in a disease state this makes it harder to determine your body’s exact requirements without blood work.

1.  To help you determine the amount of magnesium in your diet please visit this web-site... Click Here.  

2.   *Mineral chart... Click Here.

 
 
Signs of Magnesium Deficiency
 
 

ADHD (Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder )

Acute organic brain syndrome (mental impairment from psychiatric disorders.)

Anorexia (eating disorder)

Apathy (state of indifference)

Aphasia (comprehension and formulation of language)

Bone deformities

Calcium deposits in tissue

Convulsions

Delirium (Acute Confusional State)

Depression

Dizziness

Dysphagia (Difficulty with Swallowing)

Emotional agitation

Fatigue

Fluid retention

Generalized Weakness

Hyperreflexia (Twitching, Spastic Tendencies)

Hypocalcemia (low calcium)

Hypokalemia (Low Potassium)

Increased blood pressure

Kidney deterioration  

Muscle cramps

Nerve pain

Nervousness

Nystagmus (Involuntary Eye Movement)

Shooting pains

Skin deterioration  

Sodium deposits in tissue

Stress

Supraventricular arrhythmia (Rapid Heart Rhythm)

Teeth deterioration

Ventricular arrhythmias (Rapid Heart Beat)

Vertigo (Spinning Movement)

Vomiting

 
 

    Toxicity from increased magnesium intake are not common because the body removes excess amounts. Magnesium excess almost always occurs only when magnesium is supplied as a intravenous transfusion.

 
 
 

Reference

  1. Dietary Magnesium and C-reactive Protein Levels, Dana E. King, MD, et al. Department of Family Medicine (D.E.K., A.G.M., M.E.G.), Department of Biometry, Bioinfomatics, and Epidemiology (R.F.W.),Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
  2. Magnesium Deficiency In African Americans: Does It Contribute To Increased Cardiovascular Risk Factors? Chester H. Fox, MD, et al, Journal Of The National Medical Association Vol. 95, No. 4, April 2003
  3. Nutrients Catalog, by Harvey Newstrom, McFarland & Company Inc., Publishers ISBN: 0-89950-784-0
  4. Office of Dietary Supplements, Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Magnesium,
  5. American Journal of Kidney Disease, Magnesium Deficiency: Pathophysiologia and Clinical overview, vol 24 No. 5, November 1994, pp 737-752, Saeed M.G. Al-Ghamdi, MB, ChB, FRCP(C), et.al. National Kidney Foundation.
 
 

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